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Stephan Bisaha / KMUW

The Wichita School Board on Thursday applauded an update regarding the Kansas Supreme Court's recent ruling on school funding.

"The possibility of a shutdown no longer exists," Susan Willis, the district's chief financial officer, told board members. "So school will commence on time."

The court said a school finance plan passed earlier this year still isn't adequate, but gave the Kansas Legislature another year to account for inflation in its school funding formula.

photo illustration / Kansas News Service

On Monday, the Kansas Supreme Court issued a ruling that effectively said the state’s public schools could open in the fall. Yet the same decision left local district officials on Tuesday and beyond with continued, long-term uncertainty.

The high court’s decision could lead to continued fighting over school funding and the topic will likely serve as political fodder in state elections.

Michael B. / flickr Creative Commons

Kansas has some of the highest education achievement standards in the country, but students are struggling to reach that high bar.

The new report from the National Center For Education Statistics standardized state proficiency assessments for math and reading in 2015. For eighth grade, Kansas had the highest benchmark for proficiency in both reading and math out of the states evaluated.

Stephen Koranda / KPR/File photo

Updated at 9:22 a.m. Tuesday

Kansas lawmakers soon will start work to determine their response to a ruling by the state’s Supreme Court that found K-12 public school funding unconstitutional.

Kansas News Service/File photo

The top Democrats in the Kansas Legislature are calling on Senate President Susan Wagle not to wait until January to start work on fulfilling a Kansas Supreme Court order to fix funding for public schools.

Senate Minority Leader Anthony Hensley, of Topeka, and his counterpart in the House, Jim Ward of Wichita, wrote a letter to Wagle, who heads the Legislative Coordinating Council, seeking an interim bipartisan panel of House and Senate members.

Orlin Wagner / AP

Last week the state lost again at the Kansas Supreme Court, which unanimously ruled that Kansas is underfunding its public schools, with repercussions for academically struggling children across the state — and especially for students and taxpayers who live in resource-poor school districts. 

Orlin Wagner / AP

Updated Oct. 3 at 10:05 a.m.

The Kansas Supreme Court on Monday struck down the state’s aid to schools as unconstitutionally low — and unfair to poor school districts in particular. The decision could pressure lawmakers to increase school funding by hundreds of millions of dollars.