Boeing

U.S. Air Force

McConnell Air Force Base in southeast Wichita is developing the standards for training and processes for the new KC-46 air refueling tanker program.

Boeing

After nearly three years of testing, Boeing’s KC-46 tanker program has completed its final Federal Aviation Administration certification, the company said in a news release Wednesday.

 

The certification was one of the last major hurdles standing between the KC-46 and its delivery to McConnell Air Force Base.

 

The first tanker is expected to be delivered to McConnell next month.

 

U.S. Air Force

The KC-46A Pegasus tanker has passed a final test needed to ensure its delivery to McConnell Air Force base this fall.

Air Force officials said Friday that the tanker completed the final flight tests earlier this month at Boeing Field in Seattle. That clears the way for the first Boeing-built tanker to be delivered in October to McConnell.

Boeing

McConnell Air Force Base in southeast Wichita will start receiving its next generation of air refueling tankers in October.

Paul Thompson / flickr Creative Commons

Delivering a big defeat to Boeing, a U.S. trade panel ruled Friday that the aircraft giant was not harmed by competition from Canada's Bombardier.

The 4-0 decision by the independent International Trade Commission effectively blocks the Trump administration from slapping a 292 percent tariff on Bombardier products.

The U.S. Commerce Department ruled last year that the Canadian firm had unfairly received government subsidies and sold its C Series planes at artificially low prices in the United States. The trade panel disagreed.

Boeing

Boeing is reporting key milestones in its production of the KC-46 refueling tanker that’ll be coming to Wichita later this year.

The company says the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) recently certified that the fundamental design of the tanker is safe and that all systems are operating as intended.

It’s one of two FAA airworthiness certifications required for the KC-46 program.

The tanker is now in the flight-testing phase.

McConnell Air Force Base expects the first tanker to arrive in late spring.

File photo

A lawsuit between Boeing and the federal government was settled today. Boeing sued the federal government over pollution at the company’s old aircraft plant in Wichita.

A nine-year legal battle waged by former aircraft workers, who claim they lost their jobs because of their age, may have come to an end after a federal judge blocked their attorney from appealing the court's dismissal of their remaining claims because the paperwork was filed too late. KMUW's Carla Eckels reports...

The age discrimination lawsuit was sparked by the 2005 sale of Boeing's Wichita commercial operations to the parent company of Spirit AeroSystems.

File photo

A federal judge has tossed out the remaining age discrimination claims in a long-running lawsuit against the Boeing Company and Spirit AeroSystems.

U.S. District Judge Eric Melgren said in a ruling on Wednesday that he was dismissing the claims of the remaining 26 plaintiffs as a sanction for their refusal to obey a court order to give their tax returns to the companies.

The ruling deals a major blow to litigation that has already spanned nine years.

U.S. District Judge Monti Belot has set a hearing in a lawsuit against Boeing.

The Society of Professional Engineering Employees in Aerospace filed the lawsuit in 2005.

The suit over pensions and retiree medical benefits stems from when Boeing sold its commercial aircraft operations in Wichita to Spirit Aerosystems.

The Machinists union joined the lawsuit in January of 2007, and the court later consolidated it into the litigation of a similar case brought by several workers.

Pages