Nadya Faulx

Digital News Editor / Reporter

Nadya joined KMUW in May 2015 after a year at a newspaper in western North Dakota, where she did not pick up an accent.

Before entering the wild world of journalism, she studied international relations, worked at a dog daycare and taught English at a school in the Republic of Georgia (not all at the same time). KMUW marks her triumphant return to public media; she previously interned with the diversity department at the NPR mothership in Washington, D.C.

She enjoys traveling, reading, making jewelry that could easily be mistaken for the work of a 4-year-old, and hanging out with her cat, Dragon.

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golfwichita.com

The Wichita Golf Advisory Committee will hold a special meeting Tuesday to discuss an offer to buy the city's MacDonald Golf Course.

The city says it received an unsolicited letter of interest from developer Johnny Stevens to buy the golf course at 13th and Roosevelt. Stevens is behind the Waterfront development in east Wichita.

KMUW/File photo

A federal judge on Friday denied a motion to dismiss charges against Sedgwick County Commissioner and former state legislator Michael O’Donnell.

Defense attorneys argued that the case is an overreach by federal prosecutors.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

Sedgwick County Commissioner and former state Sen. Michael O’Donnell has been charged with more counts of wire fraud and money laundering related to his campaigns for office, just days before a scheduled hearing on Friday to have earlier charges dismissed.

LaRissa Lawrie / KMUW/File photo

A Republican candidate for the Sedgwick County Commission is requesting a recount of last week’s primary votes.

Shortly after the Board of Canvassers certified election results Tuesday, Hugh Nicks turned in the paperwork to start recount proceedings in his race against Commissioner Richard Ranzau. The two faced each other in the Republican primary for the commission's 4th District seat.

Nadya Faulx / KMUW

The Sedgwick County Board of Canvassers met Monday amid a heightened sense of scrutiny following last week’s primary election.

More than 1,300 provisional and disputed votes were accepted and will be added to the final vote results this week. About 900 ballots were tossed out for a number of reasons: In some cases voters didn’t sign their envelopes before mailing the ballot back in, or they weren’t registered in Sedgwick County.

LaRissa Lawrie / KMUW

Tuesday’s primaries set up a rematch in Kansas’ 4th Congressional District.

After facing each other in last year’s close special election, Rep. Ron Estes and James Thompson will once again be on the ballot in the general election in November.

Old Cowtown Museum Facebook

Residents on Tuesday urged City Council members to protect Wichita’s “quality of life” in next year’s budget.

Council members listened to more than an hour of public comments over the proposed 2019 budget — most of it centered on making sure the city’s cultural programming is funded in the future.

Ascha Lee / KMUW

The Sedgwick County election office was finalizing details ahead of the primary on Friday, holding a public demonstration of voting equipment to show that each of the more than 600 different variations of ballots will be tallied correctly on Tuesday.

Ascha Lee of KMUW/Courtesy photo

In May, just a few days before the primary filing deadline, there came news that Republican Congressman Ron Estes had an unexpected primary challenger: Ron Estes.

"I don't think the current Congress is doing their job," said Ron M. Estes, a Wichita engineer. "They're not representing the people very well in their constituency.

"So given the opportunity, yeah, I threw my name in the hat and I'm running to beat Ron Estes.”

Last spring, just minutes after learning he had lost the special election for the 4th Congressional District seat to Ron Estes, James Thompson announced he was running again.

"I announced the night that I lost that I was running in 2018 because I saw a fire that was ignited here that we needed to continue pushing," Thompson says. "There was never a question in my mind."

The civil rights lawyer has spent the past year and a half in campaign mode, largely with the same team of supporters that was behind him last year. He says a major difference in this election is time.

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